Hope & Healing Through Photography and Poetic Expression

Equilibrium

We can be sure that the greatest hope
for maintaining equilibrium in the face of any
situation rests within ourselves. 

~Francis J. Braceland

On a quest to find my own equilibrium one day, I took a short walk in my neighborhood, and met up with the Stone Stranger featured in this post. I make the same loop around the corner frequently, yet I have never seen Stone Stranger before. He was standing there quietly, mostly out of view, against the side of a vacant home. Struck by his asymmetrical posture (much like my own) I stopped to look more closely. 

I observed he had a heart-shaped face and uneven jaw line,  just like mine. I also noticed that he was clearly unweighting one of his hips (hmm?). There was a slight twist to his torso, and his pelvis was rotated forward on one side only, as he balanced a sizable load on his skull.

I could not help but wonder if he had pain… invisible pain, unobvious to those admiring his beauty and grace.

Intrigued by this encounter, I wondered why this Stone Stranger beckoned me to his remote hiding place this warm April afternoon. If he could speak to me, I thought, what might he say ?

Farewell Stone Stranger…until we meet again.

~Robyn Lee

27 responses

  1. I think we all have hidden pain even beneath the visible pain….I guess this little guy is no exception….wonderful post Robyn…you’re making me think. Hehe

    April 20, 2012 at 12:36 AM

    • Thanks David. Yes, totally agree… layers of pain most of us repress or put up with. When it gets to a physical level of torment, it’s hard to do that
      😦 I’m glad it’s got you thinking…. interesting to consider that this cute little guy is being displayed for his “beauty” and I can see distinct evidence that he may be hurting…even his little face looks sort of sad! Sleep soundly!!

      April 20, 2012 at 1:14 AM

  2. interesting.. wonder if this statue is representative of some Greek mythology…..

    April 20, 2012 at 12:50 AM

    • Hey Dean – thanks for the comment. Funny I wondered the same. I researched to try to find an image of my “friend” online and found similar but not his. Would love to know if based on a specific mythological character. He really does resemble me in a physical way – but all our asymmetries are reverse sides of the body. Maybe I will find his history is I keep searching. Amazing how a chance encounter with a statue can generate so much introspection! 🙂

      April 20, 2012 at 1:10 AM

      • wonderful to hear back from you, Robyn… 🙂 reason I mentioned that was it appears as if he’s something I remember seeing either when I was in Greece, or through some books…
        and as for reverse asymmetries, I think I have a new phrasing that will bring me a poem at some point… thank you

        April 20, 2012 at 1:18 AM

      • Thanks Dean. Will look forward to your poem! In the meantime, here is some info I came across with regard to the contrapposto pose the statue is assuming…guess asymmetries can represent quite a bit ~ RL

        From Wikipedia…
        Contrapposto is an Italian term that means counterpose. It is used in the visual arts to describe a human figure standing with most of its weight on one foot so that its shoulders and arms twist off-axis from the hips and legs.
        Contrapposto was an extremely important sculptural development for it is the first time in Western art that the human body is used to express a psychological disposition. The balanced, harmonious pose of the Kritios Boy suggests a calm and relaxed state of mind, an evenness of temperament that is part of the ideal of man represented. From this point onwards Greek sculptors went on to explore how the body could convey the whole range of human experience, culminating in the desperate anguish and pathos of Laocoön and his Sons (1st century AD) in the Hellenistic period.

        April 20, 2012 at 10:15 AM

      • thanks, Robyn – great info… 🙂

        April 20, 2012 at 11:19 AM

  3. teekay16

    Do you know I used to own an identical statue. It was a bird bath, the thing raised above his head fills with water and the birds have a bath and a drink! He has a cute little butt, which is what attracted it to me in the garden centre where I bought it! 🙂

    April 20, 2012 at 2:29 AM

    • LOL! Ok – I’m going back today to check out his butt!!! So funny. I really think I need to get myself out to a garden center and find replica of this statue now…definitely has captured my interest. Appreciate your visiting…and just checked out your blog too – it’s terrific!

      April 20, 2012 at 10:19 AM

  4. recoverythrumylens

    Wonderful to hear the story behind the image…I like this addition and how you identify with the subject…how he’s a reflection of you and how you’re feeling…very good work, Robyn!

    April 20, 2012 at 4:30 AM

    • Thanks Meryl! Glad you liked my little tale of adventure. Of course now I’m obsessed with researching why it was considered artistic and beautiful to have models pose in these “twisted” – or asymmetrical ways. I’m working so hard to “untwist” myself to relieve my pain. Maybe there is a reason I’m twisted though??!! Food for thought!! Thanks for your great feedback.

      April 20, 2012 at 10:23 AM

  5. What a wonderful encounter!

    April 20, 2012 at 7:44 AM

    • Thank you Jules!! Thought you might enjoy this one:)

      April 20, 2012 at 10:19 AM

  6. braunrcb

    I love this description of the stone stranger and how you found him.

    April 20, 2012 at 9:33 AM

    • Renee, thanks so much. Yes – I tend to have a vivid and highly charged imagination these days. Guess it’s a good thing? xo

      April 20, 2012 at 10:21 AM

  7. randubnick

    Hi Robyn. I liked the post about the garden statue. Just wanted to say that the figure is standing in contraposto pose (weight on one foot, etc.), often seen in Greek sculpture, renaissance painting, etc. In life drawing sessions, models are often asked to stand in contraposto because it is so beautiful. Love, Randi

    April 20, 2012 at 10:34 AM

    • Thanks Randi! Yes – a dear cousin of mine who is a professional artist did tell me the same 🙂 I did a bit of research on this pose stance and just shared it above with Dean. Thought this was interesting! Enjoy…

      Contrapposto is an Italian term that means counterpose. It is used in the visual arts to describe a human figure standing with most of its weight on one foot so that its shoulders and arms twist off-axis from the hips and legs.
      Contrapposto was an extremely important sculptural development for it is the first time in Western art that the human body is used to express a psychological disposition. The balanced, harmonious pose of the Kritios Boy suggests a calm and relaxed state of mind, an evenness of temperament that is part of the ideal of man represented. From this point onwards Greek sculptors went on to explore how the body could convey the whole range of human experience, culminating in the desperate anguish and pathos of Laocoön and his Sons (1st century AD) in the Hellenistic period.

      April 20, 2012 at 11:09 AM

  8. My first reaction: it is a guide, set there to find, when you are ready. This one seems to say: you are not alone, with this weight that you carry.

    April 20, 2012 at 6:29 PM

    • I really like your interpretation William. Could use all the help I can get:) Thanks so much for your thoughtful comment…

      April 20, 2012 at 7:38 PM

  9. victoriaaphotography

    Interesting info about that pose – thanks for sharing, Robyn (& the photo).

    April 20, 2012 at 8:25 PM

    • Thanks Victoria. I too thought interesting info!

      April 20, 2012 at 10:19 PM

  10. Very interesting picture and lesson about Italian art. 🙂

    April 21, 2012 at 12:08 AM

  11. If he could talk to say thanks for what most people can not tell and interpret the artist molded the child for leave a message saved in their work. At another point for our time today, played by you to us.

    April 21, 2012 at 10:03 AM

    • That is pretty amazing Carlos. Yes – so many messages this statue can convey. Your thoughts on this are thought-provoking and beautiful. Thank you!!

      April 21, 2012 at 10:13 AM

  12. it looks as though this guy is handling the weight upon his head
    and not only his shoulders … which can help carry the load better if
    thought out properly ,,, just a thought …:)

    April 21, 2012 at 9:41 PM

I am most grateful for your thoughts and comments:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s